Monday, April 16, 2018

Brilliant Bumbalough takes fifth as Flanagan battles to seventh in Boston


On what proved a gruelling day for all competitors, Kimbia athletes Andrew Bumbalough and Shalane Flanagan battled to strong performances at the Boston Marathon today, Bumbalough turning in a superb performance to finish fifth in 2:19:52, less than four minutes behind race winner Yuki Kawauchi and just over a minute off a podium finish.

Flanagan, meanwhile, endured a rough time in the conditions, with freezing temperatures, driving rain and a constant headwind hammering the runners throughout. In a race won by fellow American Desi Linden in 2:39:54, Flanagan battled to seventh place in 2:46:31.

“It was basically the nastiest conditions you could imagine running in,” said Bumbalough. “I made the decision early not to go with the lead group, it just felt a little quick for the day and we had a nice solid group of guys that stayed together for a long time. I’m really happy with the decision I made to run a pace I knew I could run for the day and see what that got me. I never anticipated how much the front group would blow up but I made the exact decision I wanted to.

“We run in pretty tough conditions in Portland, but it’s never like this. This was a deluge, an atmospheric river. I knew it was going to be tough. I didn’t realize it would be as tough as it was, but I was ready.”

It was Bumbalough’s first time cracking the top five at a major marathon. “Fifth place is great, I beat dudes I had no business beating,” he said.

His interview with Letsrun.com afterwards:

In the women’s race, reigning New York City Marathon champion Shalane Flanagan endured a tough day at the office, the Marblehead native forced to make a quick pitstop early in the race to use the portable bathroom. She soon rejoined the lead pack, but when the field began to splinter in the latter of the race, Flanagan was soon detached. Nonetheless, on a day where more than half of the elite fields failed to finish, Flanagan drew on all her resolve to reach the finish at Boylston Street.


Linden had told Flanagan early in the race that she planned to drop out, but she nonetheless helped Flanagan to rejoin the pack after her bathroom break. “She said: ‘I’ll help you get back to the pack,’” said Flanagan. “I like Des and I don’t mind talking to my friends when I’m racing. I think she wanted me to know if she could help me out, if she was going to drop out, she was willing to help me.”

On her end result, Flanagan said: “It was good, but not what I wanted. Boston is known as being a magical place, but you never know what you’re going to get. There’s nothing easy about Boston.”

Men’s result 


Women’s result

TwitterFacebookGoogle+DeliciousDiggPrintRead It LaterRedditPinterestWebnewsEmailEvernoteShare
Saturday, April 14, 2018

Flanagan, Bumbalough ready for battle in Boston


As she prepares for Monday’s Boston Marathon, Shalane Flanagan says she is in similar shape to last November, when the Bowerman Track Club athlete memorably claimed victory at the New York City Marathon.

Flanagan told Letsrun.com that her training has gone well and she believes she’s prepared to make a bold bid for her first victory in the race.

“Good, yeah, no complaints,” she said, when quizzed about her shape. “I did some sessions that were a little bit hillier to get ready for the course in Boston. It went really well so I feel safe to say I’m in similar shape to New York.”

Asked whether it will be her last marathon, Flanagan said: “I don’t know. I think it’ll probably be my last Boston, but I don’t know if it’ll be my last marathon.”

Flanagan’s life became a whirlwind in the immediate aftermath of her victory in New York, but the Marblehead native has since returned to normality as she’s laid down a heavy training block in preparation for Boston.

“After New York, I was really fatigued doing a lot of extracurricular activities and I was still running and trying to train at the same time,” she said. “And it’s really exhausting trying to do both. I was more fatigued going into this buildup because I didn’t really get a break or rest or Sanything.”

Monday’s weather is set to prove suitably adverse, with cold temperatures, rain and a headwind set to greet runners at the start in Hopkinton.

“I don’t see it as a disadvantage,” said Flanagan. “I train in conditions that are pretty similar in Oregon to what the forecast is. In general I like to have races where it’s as fair as possible, but I’m not opposed to this weather. I’m totally fine with it.”

In the men’s race, Andrew Bumbalough will be the sole representative for Kimbia, the 31-year-old bringing a PB of 2:13:58 to the race. He ran that in Tokyo in February 2017, and followed that up with a 13th place finish in Chicago last October. If things fall right for him on Monday, a top-10 finish may well be on the cards.

 

 

TwitterFacebookGoogle+DeliciousDiggPrintRead It LaterRedditPinterestWebnewsEmailEvernoteShare
Sunday, March 4, 2018

Rest in peace, Sir Roger Bannister


Kimbia athletics would like to extend its sympathies to the family, friends and all those lucky enough to know Sir Roger Bannister, who has passed away at the age of 88.

Bannister was one of the most beloved athletes ever to grace a track with his presence, and will forever be immortalized by his achievement in becoming the first man in history to break the four-minute-mile. Despite juggling his work as a full-time junior doctor, Bannister broke through a barrier many had believed was impossible at the Iffley Road Track in Oxford, a story we were honored to help document in recent years in the film Bannister: Everest on the Track.

In a moving tribute in Time Magazine, Nike founder Phil Knight recalled his trip to the Empire Games to watch Bannister’s unforgettable clash with John Landy.

After his racing career, Bannister went on to become a distinguished neurologist, working well into his eighties, and he every bit as accomplished in that field as he was on the track.

A statement from his family said: “Sir Roger Bannister died peacefully in Oxford on 3 March, aged 88, surrounded by his family who were as loved by him, as he was loved by them. He banked his treasure in the hearts of his friends.”

As the great man said himself: “If there was the opportunity to climb a mountain, or to go ballooning, or some adventurous activity, I would always be keen to do it.”

His 88 years were testament to that, a life lived to its absolute peak, one which will be forever missed, never forgotten.

Below is a longer version of an interview with Phil Knight from Everest on the Track.

Phil Knight-Empire Games

TwitterFacebookGoogle+DeliciousDiggPrintRead It LaterRedditPinterestWebnewsEmailEvernoteShare
Friday, March 2, 2018

Quigley through to world final in Birmingham

Colleen Quigley (photo: Jordan Beckett) produced an outstanding run to reach the world 1500m final in Birmingham on Friday night, the Bowerman Track Club athlete coming from behind on the final lap to finish second in her heat in 4:09.31.

Quigley will compete in the final at 8:39pm alongside her teammate at the Bowerman Track Club, Shelby Houlihan, who advanced as a non-automatic qualifier in the third and final heat. There was some measure of difficulty in today’s heat, with Quigley colliding with Sweden’s Meraf Bahta with a couple of laps to run.

“It’s an indoor track, so there’s lots of arms and legs flying around, but I was feeling really good and relaxed right before that happened. I had to fight really hard that last 100.”

TwitterFacebookGoogle+DeliciousDiggPrintRead It LaterRedditPinterestWebnewsEmailEvernoteShare
Sunday, February 25, 2018

Third in Tokyo for Classy Cragg in 2:21:42


Amy Cragg turned in a stunning performance at the Tokyo Marathon on Sunday morning, finishing third in a huge lifetime best of 2:21:42, taking more than five minutes off her previous best of 2:27:03.

That moved her to number five on the all-time US list, and left her just 23 seconds behind runner-up Ruti Aga. The race was won by Ethiopia’s Birhane Dibaba in 2:19:51. Cragg had run with the leading women up until 30K, at which point she was still on 2:20 pace, and though she couldn’t match Dibaba in the closing miles, she showed immense resolve to fight to the finish in third, rewarded with a place among the greats of American marathoning.

US women’s all-time list (via Letsrun.com)
2:19:36 Deena Kastor 2006 London
2:20:57 Jordan Hasay 2017 Chicago
2:21:14 Shalane Flanagan 2014 Berlin
2:21:21 Joan Benoit Samuelson 1985 Chicago
2:21:42 Amy Cragg 2018 Tokyo

TwitterFacebookGoogle+DeliciousDiggPrintRead It LaterRedditPinterestWebnewsEmailEvernoteShare